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Citing sources: the Desktop Dilemma series

Desktop dilemma -- citing sourcesThis newest installment of the Desktop Dilemma series takes up the question of how the Big Three genealogy desktop software packages handle citing sources. How easy do they make it to leave an effective bread-crumb trail back to where you found your facts?


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The Windows Snipping Tool: smart screen captures for free

Windows Snipping Tool--Summary ImageYou need to capture a single face out of that family reunion scan. Or perhaps you want to clip one newspaper article out of an entire page online. Maybe your clip needs to be an odd shape, or you want to draw a circle around one element. We find treasures online constantly and need to save what matters. The Windows Snipping Tool offers a simple, efficient way to do this. And it’s free.

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First impressions: the Desktop Dilemma series

Looks Sometimes MatterIn this first post evaluating our shared Desktop Dilemma, I look at first impressions. Which of the Big Three genealogy desktop software packages has dressed for success — Family Tree Maker, Legacy Family Tree, or RootsMagic? And does it matter?

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The genealogy desktop software dilemma: Family Tree Maker, Legacy, or RootsMagic?

Genealogy Desktop Software Dilemma. Face confused with logos of three competing genealogy software desktop packages: Family Tree Maker, RootsMagic, and Legacy Family TreeI am starting my family tree over. If I want to do it right this time, I must have the right tools. What genealogy desktop software can best support decades of intricate research and documentation? RootsMagic™? Family Tree Maker®? Legacy® Family Tree? I will begin to examine the “Big Three” products, feature by feature, until the best path becomes clear. And I encourage group participation.

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Techniques, archives & graduation: IGHR Friday (6 of 6)

The classroom buzzed this morning as we turned in our class projects and absorbed a few more hours of vital education. Earning our certificates of completion, we departed eager to practice what we’ve learned. Proudly, we are at last qualified  for the coveted Advanced Methodology course. Hopefully many of us will meet again there next July. (This diary began at Sunday’s Orientation.)
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Newspapers, land, and courts: IGHR Thursday (5 of 6)

IGHR Diary Day 5Thursday at IGHR, we learned to get smart about finding clues in newspapers. We examined the acquisition of lands and the federal, state, and local records that emerged. We explored wills, the intestate, and the path through probate — a path to some of genealogy’s most valuable gems. (This diary began at Sunday’s Orientation.)

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Death, taxes & the “reasonably exhaustive” standard: IGHR Wednesday (4 of 6)

IGHR Diary -- Day 4Wednesday at IGHR brought a breadth of instruction. The intricacies of tax records, creative substitutes for the “vital records,” the layers of military records, and that question that plagues all GEGs: what is “reasonably exhaustive” research? (This diary began at Sunday’s Orientation.)
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Immigration, naturalization, and genetic genealogy: IGHR Tuesday (3 of 6)

IGHR Day ThreeThe GEGs of IGHR Course 2 became very animated and inquisitive as two of genealogy’s most respected thinkers gave today’s lectures. John Philip Colletta taught us about ship travel and naturalization records. Blaine Bettinger took up the question of DNA in genealogical research. We had questions and more questions. (This diary began at Sunday’s Orientation.)

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